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» Macao has much food for thought
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Macao has much food for thought

Food for all tastes and budgets continues to be main focal point of Macao as the former Portuguese enclave celebrates 2018 as the Year of Gastronomy.

From tiny hole-in-the-wall award-winning street food to three-star Michelin quality restaurants, Macao is proud of its cuisine.

Such is Macao’s passion for good food, the Asian centre was designated a UNESCO Creative City of Gastronomy, the title reflecting as much on the cuisine’s history as to its taste.

That focus is on Macanese cuisine, a Portuguese-inspired food with local produce and ingredients collected on the spice trail between Africa, India, Malaysia and Macao.

This style of cuisine is considered one of the world’s earliest forms of fusion food.

For those planning a four-day stay, lunch time could be spent in the tranquil, somewhat sleepy, fishing village of Coloane (one of Macao’s two islands) dining on Portuguese dishes at the Espaco Lisboa Restaurant.

By night, they may consider a visit to The Parisian hotel’s Lotus Palace enjoying a traditional Chinese hot pot within a few strides from a scaled down version of the Eiffel Tower.

Head across to another corner of Cotai, and you can be entertained with a bit of theatre while you dine on a juicy steak at the upmarket SW Steakhouse within the Wynn Palace.

For another special dining experience in Macao, book a table at chef Mitsuharu Tsumura’s Aji restaurant within the new MGM Cotai.

The celebrity chef has combined traditional Peruvian cuisine with Japanese technique, the results as tantalising as they are described on the menu.

The City of Dreams boasts the upmarket Jade Dragon Chinese restaurant where you can prepare for a truly memorable degustation, a highlight being the crispy suckling pig with caviar or the pan-fried pork dumpling with abalone sauce.

Along the Macao peninsula’s waterfront at Fisherman’s Wharf, there’s the newly-opened Rio Grill and Seafood Market for wine and oysters, its neighbouring Rodiso restaurant, popular for its Brazilian-style barbecued meals.

Tiny Taipa Village continues to thrive on dining options through such long-established restaurants as O Manel and Antonio’s, famous for their traditional Portuguese cuisine, and the newly-opened Goa Nights, the only Indian restaurant in the village.

The skyline across Macao’s neon-lit Cotai area of giant resorts also continues to change with the City of Dreams set to open its flagship hotel, the Morpheus (June 15).

Designed by the late Dame Zaha Hadid, the first woman to be presented the prestigious Pritzker Architecture Award, the magnificent addition to the integrated resort is an architectural masterpiece.

Its design was inspired by jade artefacts, the building the first free-form exoskeleton-bound high rise.

visitmacao.com.au